Wednesday, July 28, 2010

Summer Reading

Ah, the pleasures of summer reading...at present I am reading these novels: Gervase Phinn, Head Over Heels in the Dales (third volume in a series) suggested by my mother in light of my interest in teaching; Double Comfort Safari Club by Alexander McCall Smith (which author, btw, my mother heartily dislikes as she finds it unrealistic on the basis of her experience in Kenya); and Pat Barker, Double Vision: A Novel. I'm locating Tana French's Faithful Place through interlibrary loan.

For more serious reading, I'm reading a book on Galatians (see previous post) and Henry Plummer on the various uses of light in Shaker Architecture. Just reading the chapter headings is an education: Simplicity--Pristine Light; Order--Focused Light; Luminosity--Inner Light; Equality--Shared Light; Time--Cyclic Light. I've never thought of light in this way. The book's illustrations are illuminating.

On Friday I'm going to a booksigning of The Hidden Children of France edited by Danielle Bailly, translated by Betty Becker-Theye and just out From SUNY Press.

Is there anything more wonderful than a good book?

1 comment:

Jane R said...

No, there isn't. Even in the midst of working on my big theological tome I have done some reading for pleasure, mysteries mostly (this and that author --Sarah Paretsky, Robert Parker, Peter Tremayne, Victoria Thompson, and my first Alexander McCall Smith --yes, it took me this long to get to him-- so I was interested to read your comment), and some theology that isn't in the Tome -- new U.S. Latin@ works by Orlando Espín and by Carmen Nanko-Fernández. Oh, and Rosemary Radford Ruether's new book about her son's schizophrenia --written with him and in consultation with her whole family-- _Many Forms of Madness_.

Also a gorgeous, gorgeous fat book I haven't finished yet and I should have read ages ago (it came out about 8 yrs ago), Paul Elie's _The Life You Save May Be Your Own: An American Pilgrimage_: marvelous biographical-literary-spiritual book about Flannery O'Connor, Dorothy Day, Thomas Merton, and Walker Percy.

And here I thought I hadn't been reading for fun. I did pack quite a few books in, many of them, mostly the mysteries, in the two or three weeks after school ended. I was just starved for fiction.

On my bedstand waiting to be read: Abraham Joshua Heschel's _Moral Grandeur and Spiritual Audacity_, edited by his daughter Susannah Heschel. Also still need to finish _Istanbul_ by Orhan Pamuk; I think because I began it during the academic year I can't bring myself to pick it up. I've also been keeping Neruda's Selected Poems around (the bilingual edition) and when I am not keeling over tired, I read a poem before going to sleep. It chases away the nightmares.

Loved reading about your readings!