Sunday, April 27, 2014

"What if Arianism Had Won?" Diarmaid McCullough 4th lecture in Princeton in Europe series

Gospel of Thomas critical edition by Uwe-Karsten Plisch on sale



We have acquired more copies of this critical edition of the Gospel of Thomas and are offering it at over 70% off. See details below for more information on this helpful resource.
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Plisch, Uwe-Karsten
Gospel of Thomas: Original Text with Commentary
(Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft, 2008)
Hardcover List: $69.95 Your Price: $19.99
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The Gospel of Thomas, a collection of words of Jesus, is one of the most significant extrabiblical texts of the early Christian era. This edition presents the texts in the classical languages and provides an English translation and a readily readable commentary.

It includes:

- an introduction to the Gospel of Thomas - the complete Coptic text
- the text of the Greek fragments and a Greek retranslation of all logia with parallel texts from the canonic gospels
- an English translation - an extensive commentary
- illustrations of the Coptic manuscript
- an appendix with an index and bibliography The introduction and commentary do not assume knowledge of the classical languages, making The Gospel of Thomas accessible to a broad audience.

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Baptism at Ephesus?

There is now some scholarly consensus that 1 Timothy 6 alludes to baptism at Ephesus.

1Tim. 6:11 But as for you (Timothy), man of God, shun all this; pursue righteousness, godliness, faith, love, endurance, gentleness. Fight the good fight of the faith; take hold of the eternal life, to which you were called and for which you made the good confession [AORIST tense indicates a specific event--Timothy's baptism?] in the presence of many witnesses. In the presence of God, who gives life to all things, and of Christ Jesus, who in his testimony before Pontius Pilate made the good confession, I charge you to keep the commandment without spot or blame until the manifestation of our Lord Jesus Christ, which he will bring about at the right time—he who is the blessed and only Sovereign, the King of kings and Lord of lords. It is he alone who has immortality and dwells in unapproachable light, whom no one has ever seen or can see; to him be honor and eternal dominion. Amen. 

Here we have a possible allusion to Timothy's Baptism including confession and commitment. Since 1 Tim was written in Ephesus, we have here evidence of baptism at Ephesus maybe in the Baptistry of the Basilica of St John. The "presence of many witnesses" may include the congregation at Ephesus. 


Wednesday, April 09, 2014

Erich Gruen April 10th "Christians & Jews in the Age of Nero" Live streamed


2014 Divinity-Classics Lecture

Erich S. Gruen, U.C., Berkeley
CHRISTIANAND JEWS IN THE AGE OF NERO
Introduction by John J. Collins
    Yale Divinity School
           
                      Thursday, April 10, 2014 6:00pm
                       Linsly Chittenden Hall, (LC-101), 63 High Street
This lecture is free and open to the public.
Reception to follow.
 
The lecture takes as its starting point the arrival of Paul in Rome. It attempts toreconstruct the atmosphere for Jews and Christians in Neronian Rome at that point, toconsider the attitude of the Roman government toward them, to discern their relationswith one another, and to ask what Paul might have anticipated when he chose to appealto the emperor and present his case before the imperial throne.
 
Erich S. Gruen is the Gladys Rehard Wood Professor Emeritus at U.C., Berkeley. His most recent books include,Diaspora: Jews amidst Greeks and Romans (Harvard University Press) and Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (PrincetonUniversity Press). For more information about Professor Emeritus Gruen,
 
John J. Collins is the Holmes Professor of Old Testament Criticism and Interpretation at Yale Divinity School.
 
The lecture will be livestreamed at http://new.livestream.com/yaledivinityschool
 
Sponsored by Yale University’s Divinity School,
Department of Classics, and Judaic Studies Program.